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Travel Theme in iPhoto '08

Table of Contents
Summary of Outside Layouts
Summary of Inside Layouts
Backgrounds
Cover Examples
One-photo Layout Examples
Two-photo Layout Examples
Three-photo Layout Examples
Four-photo Layout Examples
Six- and Seven-photo Layout Examples

(Note that the Travel theme has been updated for iPhoto '09.)

The Travel theme is characterized by passport-style stamps on yellow or orange backgrounds. It has a special four-photo layout with a postcard. The cover and inside flap offer a variety of layouts, and there are also Introduction and blank pages, as well as interior layouts for one, two, three, four, six, and even seven photos. One thing to keep in mind is that the Travel theme doesn't have any pages with captions. It does offer a chunk of text on some of the two-photo layouts and a postcard and scrap of paper on the four-photo layout.

On the left in the example below is a single photo with stamped orange background. On the right is a four-photo layout.

Summary of Outside Layouts

The Travel layout's cover has either a manila-folder-yellow or kraft-paper-striped-orange background with one, two, three, or six photos at jaunty angles. You can also choose a single photo for a full bleed. The inside flap is also more generous than most offering a completely plain background, one with travel-theme stamps, one with photos and stamps, one with text and stamps, and one with photo, text, and stamps. You can choose either the yellow or orange background for each of those.

Summary of Inside Layouts

Backgrounds

The Travel theme offers either a manila-folder-yellow or kraft-paper-striped orange background for the outside and adds the Palm Tree to let you use any image you want for the background of the inside pages.

Cover Examples

As with other covers, there is a full bleed cover layout that crops your photos to fit (below left). If you'd rather the photo have its original orientation, right-click and choose Fit Photo to Frame from the pop-up menu (below right):

With one photo and a caption, the layout is determined by the original orientation of your photo. Horizontal photos even get a stamp:

With Layout 3, two horizontal photos are shown with a lacey frame, a simple frame and a stamp:

But if you use two vertical photos (or indeed one horizontal and one vertical), you just get simple frames and no stamp:

With the three-photo layout, you'll get two rigid horizontal stacked frames on the left and one large vertical frame on the right. Photos are cropped to fit:

With the six-photo layout, the photos are scattered jauntily across the cover in two rows of three photos each. The photos maintain their original orientation:

One-photo Layout Examples

There are five one-photo layouts: a full bleed, a large photo with or without stamps, and two mosaic-ified? photo layouts with varying numbers of stamps. As expected, the layouts vary according to the original orientation of the photos.

Curiously, the original orientation of the photos affects how many stamps are shown. Layout 2 (below on left) shows vertical photos with no stamps and horizontal ones with an upper-right stamp:

Layout 3 shows vertical photos with an upper-left stamp and horizontal photos with a lower-right stamp:

Layouts 4 and 5 display mosaic-ified versions of photos, an effect which seems cooler than it is. Both layouts are virtually identical with a horizontal photo. The placement of the stamps varies with vertical photos.

Two-photo layouts

There are an incredible variety of two-photo layouts.

Layouts 1, 2, and 9 look very similar but vary more or less depending on the original orientation of the photos you choose for them. Layout 1 puts similarly oriented photos next to each other at the same size (below, left), and differently oriented photos with one slightly larger than the other:

Layout 2 shows similarly-oriented photos farther apart, but shows differently-oriented photos much the same as in layout 1, with one difference: vertical photos looks as if they've been folded and unfolded:

Layout 9 is very similar to layout 1, with slightly smaller photos, but has a block of text below the photos. I suppose they stuck it all the way down at the bottom of the menu because it has text, but I think it should go with layouts 1 and 2.

Layouts 3-8 are pretty self-explanatory, and don't vary greatly with the orientation. In layouts 3 and 4, there's a small photo on a full-bleed background photo. Layouts 5 and 6 add a horizontal band of text (on the top or the bottom). Layouts 7 and 8 add a vertical band of text (either on the left or right). Before the Palm Tree background option, this was the only theme that offered one photo on top of another.

Three-photo Layout Examples

The three-photo layouts vary quite a bit depending on the original orientation of the photos you feed into them. Below on the left are three horizontal photos, which are always displayed with a stack of two on the left and a larger one to the right. On the right, you see three vertical photos, one large, pseudo-folded one flanked by two smaller ones.

If you add a vertical photo to three horizontals, the vertical one expands in the larger frame. Likewise, if you add horizontal photos to the smaller spots in the three verticals, the middle vertical stays big.

The curious thing is if you switch one of the horizontals for the vertical (for example, in the right-hand side shown above), the horizontal picture is cropped to fit in the vertical frame, and the layout doesn't change. But if you had started with two horizontals and a vertical, you won't ever get the big vertical in the middle. It's all in the order in which you place the images.

Four-photo Layout Examples

The four-photo travel layout is attractive but rigid. There are four photo frames, for three horizontal and one vertical photo. If you put a horizontally oriented photo in a vertical frame, or vice-versa, they will be cropped to fit. There is also a postcard and a little slip of paper that you can add text to.

Six- and Seven-photo Layout Examples

Just when I thought I'd never finish with the Travel theme, it turns out that the six- and seven-photo layouts are extremely simple and rigid. The six-photo theme changes frames according to whether you use horizontal or vertical photos, but doesn't change any of the photo's sizes accordingly--that is, the general layout stays the same. The seven-photo layout has two spots for vertical photos and five for horizontal ones. If you put a differently-oriented photo, it is cropped to fit.


If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, I'd love to hear them.


Copyright 2007 by Elizabeth Castro. Please don't copy this page. Instead, link to it!

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Page last modified on February 25, 2009, at 11:17 AM EST

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